hello my name is steven! this blog consists mostly of nature, animals and body modification, enjoy your time here and be sure to follow me (:

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11th October 2014

Photo reblogged from hey there! with 1 note

elyfoster:Heres a selfie with a dog in a hat lol
As you can see here, a picture of a human and a dog, for science! Lol selfie with allysons dog

elyfoster:

Heres a selfie with a dog in a hat lol

As you can see here, a picture of a human and a dog, for science! Lol selfie with allysons dog

11th October 2014

Photo reblogged from Nature and more with 176 notes

frogs-are-awesome:

fallingspecies:

Carrikeri harlequin frog
A species of toad in the Bufonidae family.  This two inch toad, from northern Columbia, is critically endangered due to a fungal outbreak and increasing habitat destruction due to agricultural needs.  Believed extinct for a time, it was rediscovered in early 2008.
Image Credit: Giovanni Alberto Chaves Portilla - Berkeley.edu

a.k.a. Guajira stubfoot toad (Atelopus carrikeri)

frogs-are-awesome:

fallingspecies:

Carrikeri harlequin frog

A species of toad in the Bufonidae family.  This two inch toad, from northern Columbia, is critically endangered due to a fungal outbreak and increasing habitat destruction due to agricultural needs.  Believed extinct for a time, it was rediscovered in early 2008.

Image Credit: Giovanni Alberto Chaves Portilla - Berkeley.edu

a.k.a. Guajira stubfoot toad (Atelopus carrikeri)

Source: Wikipedia

11th October 2014

Photo reblogged from fauna with 37 notes

rhamphotheca:

Where the Shark and the Snapper Roam
The pre-industrial American landscape was once rightly described as a place where “the deer and the antelope roam.” On land, we take it for granted that the plant-eating deer and antelope far outnumber the wolves and other predators that eat them.
Over the years, when scientists saw many plant-eaters and small fish on coral reefs but relatively few large predators like sharks and snappers, they assumed that the underwater landscape mirrored this familiar pattern. But as we explore reefs far from human settlements, we’re finding that this assumption may be wrong: coral reefs and other coastal ocean areas may have a very different structure to them.
The science underlying this pattern has to do with how energy (food) moves from the bottom to the top of the food chain. Plants (at the bottom of the food chain) capture the energy in sunlight and use some of it to grow and reproduce. In turn, some of this new plant material is transferred to the animals that eat them, including the deer and the antelope. These plant-eaters then feed animal-eaters, such as wolves…
(read more: Smithsonian’s Ocean Portal)

rhamphotheca:

Where the Shark and the Snapper Roam

The pre-industrial American landscape was once rightly described as a place where “the deer and the antelope roam.” On land, we take it for granted that the plant-eating deer and antelope far outnumber the wolves and other predators that eat them.

Over the years, when scientists saw many plant-eaters and small fish on coral reefs but relatively few large predators like sharks and snappers, they assumed that the underwater landscape mirrored this familiar pattern. But as we explore reefs far from human settlements, we’re finding that this assumption may be wrong: coral reefs and other coastal ocean areas may have a very different structure to them.

The science underlying this pattern has to do with how energy (food) moves from the bottom to the top of the food chain. Plants (at the bottom of the food chain) capture the energy in sunlight and use some of it to grow and reproduce. In turn, some of this new plant material is transferred to the animals that eat them, including the deer and the antelope. These plant-eaters then feed animal-eaters, such as wolves…

(read more: Smithsonian’s Ocean Portal)

11th October 2014

Photo reblogged from animaux with 64 notes

animals-animals-animals:

Long Legged Beetle (by Till Kresslein)

animals-animals-animals:

Long Legged Beetle (by Till Kresslein)

11th October 2014

Photoset reblogged from fauna with 119 notes

rhamphotheca:

Inga the Tufted Capuchin Monkey (Sapajus apella), Nouragues, French Guiana, wants to remind you that THIS IS HER FRUIT YOU SON OF A BITCH!!!

photographer: Sean McCann/Flickr

10th October 2014

Photo reblogged from Find Your Freedom in the Music with 39,444 notes

reddlr-earthporn:

A beautiful pool in Yellowstone National Park. [1011x678]

reddlr-earthporn:

A beautiful pool in Yellowstone National Park. [1011x678]

Source: reddlr-earthporn

9th October 2014

Photo reblogged from Nature and more with 79 notes

libutron:

Canal Zone Treefrog - Hypsiboas rufitelus 
Hypsiboas rufitelus (Hylidae) is a relatively uncommon nocturnal treefrog native to Costa Rica, Nicaragua and Panama. As the species name suggests (rufitelus comes from the Latin meaning reddish web) the hands and feet of these frogs are extensively webbed. The red webbing and the presence of a spine at the base of the thumb distinguishes this hylid from similar species.
In 2005, this species was included as part of the Hypsiboas pellucens Group.
References: [1] - [2] - [3]
Photo credit: ©Brian Kubicki | Locality: Siquirres, Limon, Costa Rica (2004)

libutron:

Canal Zone Treefrog - Hypsiboas rufitelus 

Hypsiboas rufitelus (Hylidae) is a relatively uncommon nocturnal treefrog native to Costa Rica, Nicaragua and Panama. As the species name suggests (rufitelus comes from the Latin meaning reddish web) the hands and feet of these frogs are extensively webbed. The red webbing and the presence of a spine at the base of the thumb distinguishes this hylid from similar species.

In 2005, this species was included as part of the Hypsiboas pellucens Group.

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©Brian Kubicki | Locality: Siquirres, Limon, Costa Rica (2004)

9th October 2014

Photo reblogged from Nature is home, with 166 notes

9th October 2014

Photo reblogged from Nature is home, with 635 notes

9th October 2014

Photo reblogged from Nature is home, with 33 notes

8th October 2014

Photo reblogged from Nature is home, with 69 notes

8th October 2014

Photo reblogged from Wissenschaft und Deutsch with 121 notes

scienceyoucanlove:

rtamerica:

Dallas Ebola patient has died, hospital confirms
The Liberian national who recently became the first man to ever be diagnosed in the United States with Ebola died early Wednesday, a Dallas, Texas hospital said.

"It is with profound sadness and heartfelt disappointment that we must inform you of the death of Thomas Eric Duncan this morning at 7:51 am," Texas Health Resources said in a statement. "Mr. Duncan succumbed to an insidious disease, Ebola. He fought courageously in this battle. Our professionals, the doctors and nurses in the unit, as well as the entire Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas community, are also grieving his passing. We have offered the family our support and condolences at this difficult time."

How could they run out of vaccine before he passed :/

scienceyoucanlove:

rtamerica:

Dallas Ebola patient has died, hospital confirms

The Liberian national who recently became the first man to ever be diagnosed in the United States with Ebola died early Wednesday, a Dallas, Texas hospital said.

"It is with profound sadness and heartfelt disappointment that we must inform you of the death of Thomas Eric Duncan this morning at 7:51 am," Texas Health Resources said in a statement. "Mr. Duncan succumbed to an insidious disease, Ebola. He fought courageously in this battle. Our professionals, the doctors and nurses in the unit, as well as the entire Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas community, are also grieving his passing. We have offered the family our support and condolences at this difficult time."

How could they run out of vaccine before he passed :/

Source: rtamerica

6th October 2014

Photoset reblogged from fauna with 482 notes

rhamphotheca:

Lost Frogs: Finding The World’s Rarest Amphibians - In Pictures

In Search of Lost Frogs is the story of conservationist and photographer Robin Moore’s journey from Colombia to Costa Rica and Israel to India to find lost species, a quest he embarked upon – later joined by 126 researchers in 21 countries – in 2010.

He has founded the Amphibian Survival Alliance and is a fellow of the International League of Conservation Photographers. The expedition and its discoveries give hope that it is still not too late to save some species, and they are all remarkable as is illustrated by Moore’s stunning photographs here…

(read more: Guardian UK)

5th October 2014

Photo reblogged from fauna with 1,050 notes

astronomy-to-zoology:

Psammodesmus bryophorus
…is a species of Platyrhacid (Platyrhacidae) Polydesmid millipede which was first described in Colombia in 2011. It is noted for the several species of symbiotic mosses found growing on its dorsal surface, making it the first millipede known to have epizoic plants!
Classification
Animalia-Arthropoda-Myriapoda-Diplopoda-Polydesmida-Platyrhacidae-Psammodesmus-P. bryophorus
Image: Shirley Daniella Martínez-Torres, Álvaro Eduardo Flórez Daza, Edgar Leonardo Linares-Castillo

astronomy-to-zoology:

Psammodesmus bryophorus

…is a species of Platyrhacid (Platyrhacidae) Polydesmid millipede which was first described in Colombia in 2011. It is noted for the several species of symbiotic mosses found growing on its dorsal surface, making it the first millipede known to have epizoic plants!

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Myriapoda-Diplopoda-Polydesmida-Platyrhacidae-Psammodesmus-P. bryophorus

Image: Shirley Daniella Martínez-Torres, Álvaro Eduardo Flórez Daza, Edgar Leonardo Linares-Castillo

Source: astronomy-to-zoology

5th October 2014

Photo reblogged from Nature and more with 71 notes

libutron:

Manchewe Falls | ©Sanjeev Deo  (Malawi)

libutron:

Manchewe Falls | ©Sanjeev Deo  (Malawi)