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21st August 2014

Photo reblogged from fauna with 171 notes

rhamphotheca:

Boophis ankarafensis:
A New Species of the Boophis rappiodes group (Anura, Mantellidae) from the Sahamalaza Peninsula, northwest Madagascar, with Acoustic Monitoring of its Nocturnal Calling  [2014]
A new species of treefrog of the Boophis rappiodes group (Anura, Mantellidae) is described from the Sahamalaza – Iles Radama National Park in northwest Madagascar.
This new species is green in colour with bright red speckling across its head and dorsum; similar in morphology to other species of this group including: B. bottae, B. rappiodes, B. erythrodactylus and B. tasymena.
All individuals were detected from the banks of two streams in Ankarafa Forest. The new species represents the only member of the B. rappiodes group endemic to Madagascar’s western coast, with the majority of other members known from the eastern rainforest belt.
Despite its conspicuous call, it has not been detected from other surveys of northwest Madagascar and it is likely to be a local endemic to the peninsula. The ranges of two other amphibian species also appear restricted to Sahamalaza, and so the area seems to support a high level of endemicity.
Although occurring inside a National Park, this species is highly threatened by the continuing decline in the quality and extent of its habitat. Due to these threats it is proposed that this species should be classified as Critically Endangered according to the IUCN Red List criteria…
read the paper  
(via: NovaTaxa - Species New to Science)

rhamphotheca:

Boophis ankarafensis:

A New Species of the Boophis rappiodes group (Anura, Mantellidae) from the Sahamalaza Peninsula, northwest Madagascar, with Acoustic Monitoring of its Nocturnal Calling  [2014]

A new species of treefrog of the Boophis rappiodes group (Anura, Mantellidae) is described from the Sahamalaza – Iles Radama National Park in northwest Madagascar.

This new species is green in colour with bright red speckling across its head and dorsum; similar in morphology to other species of this group including: B. bottae, B. rappiodes, B. erythrodactylus and B. tasymena.

All individuals were detected from the banks of two streams in Ankarafa Forest. The new species represents the only member of the B. rappiodes group endemic to Madagascar’s western coast, with the majority of other members known from the eastern rainforest belt.

Despite its conspicuous call, it has not been detected from other surveys of northwest Madagascar and it is likely to be a local endemic to the peninsula. The ranges of two other amphibian species also appear restricted to Sahamalaza, and so the area seems to support a high level of endemicity.

Although occurring inside a National Park, this species is highly threatened by the continuing decline in the quality and extent of its habitat. Due to these threats it is proposed that this species should be classified as Critically Endangered according to the IUCN Red List criteria…

read the paper 

(via: NovaTaxa - Species New to Science)

21st August 2014

Photo reblogged from xoxo. with 3,820 notes

floeme:

Realm of the Night

floeme:

Realm of the Night

Source: floeme

21st August 2014

Photoset reblogged from xoxo. with 73,665 notes

wiitch-craft:

nightoesphere:

alexander-burton:

Here are some phone pics of my sleeping arrangement for the past few days (living outdoors is the best)

.◦❀◦.

✯☽

Source: alexander-burton

21st August 2014

Photo reblogged from fauna with 52 notes

rhamphotheca:

A school of Convict Tang (Acanthurus triostegus) with a couple of Whitebar Sugreonfish (Acanthurus leucopareius) at the Kure Atoll State Wildlife Refuge in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Marine Monument.Photograph: Paulo Maurin
(via: National Marine Sanctuary Foundation)

rhamphotheca:

A school of Convict Tang (Acanthurus triostegus) with a couple of Whitebar Sugreonfish (Acanthurus leucopareius) at the Kure Atoll State Wildlife Refuge in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Marine Monument.

Photograph: Paulo Maurin

(via: National Marine Sanctuary Foundation)

21st August 2014

Photo reblogged from fauna with 187 notes

rhamphotheca:

Alligator Snapping Turtle (Macrochelys temminckii), Suwanee River, FL 
This large male was caught as part of routine environmental surveys involving Professor Arthur Georges, the Chief Scientist of the Institute for Applied Ecology, University of Canberra, Australia
(via: ScienceAlert)

rhamphotheca:

Alligator Snapping Turtle (Macrochelys temminckii), Suwanee River, FL

This large male was caught as part of routine environmental surveys involving Professor Arthur Georges, the Chief Scientist of the Institute for Applied Ecology, University of Canberra, Australia

(via: ScienceAlert)

20th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Nature is home, with 70 notes

Source: graymanphotography

20th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Insects with 7,987 notes

insectlove:

lawebloca: via
drhoz: Another Citheronia caterpillar

insectlove:

laweblocavia

drhoz: Another Citheronia caterpillar

Source: lawebloca

20th August 2014

Link reblogged from fauna with 53 notes

World Parrot Trust: Save Africa's Parrots →

Africa’s Parrots Need Your Help!

Many populations of parrots are threatened with extinction. In Africa the problem is particularly urgent - parrots there face an increasing number of threats, from harvesting for the wildlife trade and habitat loss, to disease and persecution as crop pests. The World Parrot Trust is focusing its attention on their plight, and we need your help!

20th August 2014

Photo reblogged from fauna with 289 notes

rhamphotheca:

Scientists Study “Talking” Turtles in Brazilian Amazon
via: Wildlife Conservation Society
Authors find that Giant South American river turtles have a repertoire of vocalizations for different behavioral situations, including caring for young
Turtles are well known for their longevity and protective shells, but it turns out these reptiles use sound to stick together and care for young, according to the Wildlife Conservation Society and other organizations.  Scientists working in the Brazilian Amazon have found that Giant South American river turtles (Podocnemis expansa), or Arraus, actually use several different kinds of vocal communication to coordinate their social behaviors, including one used by female turtles to call to their newly hatched offspring in what is the first instance of recorded parental care in turtles.
“These distinctive sounds made by turtles give us unique insights into their behavior, although we don’t know what the sounds mean,” said Dr. Camila Ferrara, Aquatic Turtle Specialist for the WCS Brazil Program. “The social behaviors of these reptiles are much more complex than previously thought.”…
(read more: Wildlife Conservation Society)
photograph by © C. Ferrara/WCS

rhamphotheca:

Scientists Study “Talking” Turtles in Brazilian Amazon

via: Wildlife Conservation Society

Authors find that Giant South American river turtles have a repertoire of vocalizations for different behavioral situations, including caring for young

Turtles are well known for their longevity and protective shells, but it turns out these reptiles use sound to stick together and care for young, according to the Wildlife Conservation Society and other organizations.

Scientists working in the Brazilian Amazon have found that Giant South American river turtles (Podocnemis expansa), or Arraus, actually use several different kinds of vocal communication to coordinate their social behaviors, including one used by female turtles to call to their newly hatched offspring in what is the first instance of recorded parental care in turtles.

“These distinctive sounds made by turtles give us unique insights into their behavior, although we don’t know what the sounds mean,” said Dr. Camila Ferrara, Aquatic Turtle Specialist for the WCS Brazil Program. “The social behaviors of these reptiles are much more complex than previously thought.”…

(read more: Wildlife Conservation Society)

photograph by © C. Ferrara/WCS

20th August 2014

Photo reblogged from fauna with 66 notes

rhamphotheca:

Not a walkingstick… it’s an assassin bug (genus Emesaya). 
These and other members of the subfamily Emisinae are called thread-legged bugs. They are true bugs more closely related to things like stinkbugs and milkweed bugs than to walkingsticks, despite the similar appearance. 
Thread-legged bugs are predators, and their two front legs are modified for grabbing and grasping, much like those in praying mantids. They are small insects, averaging less than 1.3 in (3 cm), though some may reach twice that length. 
Some species have been observed stealing insects caught in spider webs, and even hunting the web’s owner itself. As in other assassin bugs, thread-legged bugs have a sturdy, straw-like proboscis that they puncture their prey with; they inject a lethal saliva that also liquifies the prey’s insides, and then suck it up. 
Thread-legged bugs can be found through much of the year and across most of the continental United States, into parts of southern Canada.photo by Jenn Forman Orth (urtica) on Flickr
(via: Peterson Field Guides)

rhamphotheca:

Not a walkingstick… it’s an assassin bug (genus Emesaya).

These and other members of the subfamily Emisinae are called thread-legged bugs. They are true bugs more closely related to things like stinkbugs and milkweed bugs than to walkingsticks, despite the similar appearance.

Thread-legged bugs are predators, and their two front legs are modified for grabbing and grasping, much like those in praying mantids. They are small insects, averaging less than 1.3 in (3 cm), though some may reach twice that length.

Some species have been observed stealing insects caught in spider webs, and even hunting the web’s owner itself. As in other assassin bugs, thread-legged bugs have a sturdy, straw-like proboscis that they puncture their prey with; they inject a lethal saliva that also liquifies the prey’s insides, and then suck it up.

Thread-legged bugs can be found through much of the year and across most of the continental United States, into parts of southern Canada.

photo by Jenn Forman Orth (urtica) on Flickr

(via: Peterson Field Guides)

20th August 2014

Photo reblogged from fauna with 587 notes

rhamphotheca:

African Red Trapdoor Spider (Ctenolophus sp.),
family Idiopidae, Southern Africa
Like most of the spiders in this family, they build tunnels in which to live and from which they ambush prey. Many species construct “trap doors” at the entrance, constructed of silk, dirt and debris.
(photo: Matt Reinbold)

rhamphotheca:

African Red Trapdoor Spider (Ctenolophus sp.),

family Idiopidae, Southern Africa

Like most of the spiders in this family, they build tunnels in which to live and from which they ambush prey. Many species construct “trap doors” at the entrance, constructed of silk, dirt and debris.

(photo: Matt Reinbold)

20th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Nature is home, with 41 notes

20th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Nature and more with 298 notes

musts:

© Jenny Huang
Tasman glacier, New Zealand

musts:

© Jenny Huang

Tasman glacier, New Zealand

Source: musts

20th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from fauna with 3,491 notes

rhamphotheca:

for-science-sakeTree Bark Camo

  1. Mossy Leaf-Tailed Gecko
  2. Grey Tree Frog 
  3. Grey Cicada 
  4. Casque head Chameleon 
  5. Lichen Spider
  6. Underwing Moth
  7. Peppered Moth
  8. Owl Fly Larva
  9. Eastern Screech Owl 

Source: for-science-sake

19th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from est.94 with 37,090 notes

mangoestho:

pharaohpfeil:

micdotcom:

Vile photos show the crisis at the U.S.-Mexico border no one is talking about

With a spate of huge stories breaking in the past few weeks, you might not have caught the massive environmental crisis in northern Mexico that began earlier in August.

According to the Associated Press, local politicians claim that Grupo Mexico, a private mining company in Sonora with a troubling track record of hazardous waste violations in Mexico and the U.S., was slow to report a disastrous fault in its leaching ponds, which hold industrial acid used in the mining process. The spill released around 10 million gallons of acid into the Bacanuchi and Sonora Rivers.

20,000 people were without water | Follow micdotcom 

whaaat the FUUUCK

NO

OH MY GOD NOOOOOOOOOOO!

Source: micdotcom